npr:

You may not know the name Homer Laughlin, a china factory in Newell, W. Va., but you’ll likely recognize — or have eaten off of — its most famous product: brightly colored, informal pottery called Fiesta.
While most of America’s china factories have closed, unable to compete with “made in China” or Japan or Mexico, Homer Laughlin, which set up shop on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873, is still going strong. It employs about 1,000 people.
Linda Wertheimer takes us into the depths of the factory — which feels like a relic from a different time — to show us how Fiesta has kept this company going.
Photos/GIFs by Ross Mantle for NPR
Zoom Info
npr:

You may not know the name Homer Laughlin, a china factory in Newell, W. Va., but you’ll likely recognize — or have eaten off of — its most famous product: brightly colored, informal pottery called Fiesta.
While most of America’s china factories have closed, unable to compete with “made in China” or Japan or Mexico, Homer Laughlin, which set up shop on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873, is still going strong. It employs about 1,000 people.
Linda Wertheimer takes us into the depths of the factory — which feels like a relic from a different time — to show us how Fiesta has kept this company going.
Photos/GIFs by Ross Mantle for NPR
Zoom Info
npr:

You may not know the name Homer Laughlin, a china factory in Newell, W. Va., but you’ll likely recognize — or have eaten off of — its most famous product: brightly colored, informal pottery called Fiesta.
While most of America’s china factories have closed, unable to compete with “made in China” or Japan or Mexico, Homer Laughlin, which set up shop on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873, is still going strong. It employs about 1,000 people.
Linda Wertheimer takes us into the depths of the factory — which feels like a relic from a different time — to show us how Fiesta has kept this company going.
Photos/GIFs by Ross Mantle for NPR
Zoom Info
npr:

You may not know the name Homer Laughlin, a china factory in Newell, W. Va., but you’ll likely recognize — or have eaten off of — its most famous product: brightly colored, informal pottery called Fiesta.
While most of America’s china factories have closed, unable to compete with “made in China” or Japan or Mexico, Homer Laughlin, which set up shop on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873, is still going strong. It employs about 1,000 people.
Linda Wertheimer takes us into the depths of the factory — which feels like a relic from a different time — to show us how Fiesta has kept this company going.
Photos/GIFs by Ross Mantle for NPR
Zoom Info

npr:

You may not know the name Homer Laughlin, a china factory in Newell, W. Va., but you’ll likely recognize — or have eaten off of — its most famous product: brightly colored, informal pottery called Fiesta.

While most of America’s china factories have closed, unable to compete with “made in China” or Japan or Mexico, Homer Laughlin, which set up shop on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873, is still going strong. It employs about 1,000 people.

Linda Wertheimer takes us into the depths of the factory — which feels like a relic from a different time — to show us how Fiesta has kept this company going.

Photos/GIFs by Ross Mantle for NPR

npr:

lookatthisstory:

What is beauty? We went to Brazil, the plastic surgery capital of the world, and asked 7 women to talk about it. 
"For me, being beautiful is being skinny," says Thairine (in the pink dress). 
More portraits by Jimmy Chalk + words from Thairine, Janet, Maria and Gisele (above) — and three other women: 
—>  Look At This  <—

"The mirror starts talking with you. Society really demands a lot. I think it’s horrible. If you’re fat, you need to own it. If you’re skinny, you need to own it. Maybe I’ve felt this way and that has led me to do so many surgeries. It’s complicated." — Maria da Gloria de Sousa
Look At This is NPR’s experiment in visual storytelling.
Zoom Info
npr:

lookatthisstory:

What is beauty? We went to Brazil, the plastic surgery capital of the world, and asked 7 women to talk about it. 
"For me, being beautiful is being skinny," says Thairine (in the pink dress). 
More portraits by Jimmy Chalk + words from Thairine, Janet, Maria and Gisele (above) — and three other women: 
—>  Look At This  <—

"The mirror starts talking with you. Society really demands a lot. I think it’s horrible. If you’re fat, you need to own it. If you’re skinny, you need to own it. Maybe I’ve felt this way and that has led me to do so many surgeries. It’s complicated." — Maria da Gloria de Sousa
Look At This is NPR’s experiment in visual storytelling.
Zoom Info
npr:

lookatthisstory:

What is beauty? We went to Brazil, the plastic surgery capital of the world, and asked 7 women to talk about it. 
"For me, being beautiful is being skinny," says Thairine (in the pink dress). 
More portraits by Jimmy Chalk + words from Thairine, Janet, Maria and Gisele (above) — and three other women: 
—>  Look At This  <—

"The mirror starts talking with you. Society really demands a lot. I think it’s horrible. If you’re fat, you need to own it. If you’re skinny, you need to own it. Maybe I’ve felt this way and that has led me to do so many surgeries. It’s complicated." — Maria da Gloria de Sousa
Look At This is NPR’s experiment in visual storytelling.
Zoom Info

npr:

lookatthisstory:

What is beauty? We went to Brazil, the plastic surgery capital of the world, and asked 7 women to talk about it. 

"For me, being beautiful is being skinny," says Thairine (in the pink dress). 

More portraits by Jimmy Chalk + words from Thairine, Janet, Maria and Gisele (above) — and three other women: 

—>  Look At This  <—

"The mirror starts talking with you. Society really demands a lot. I think it’s horrible. If you’re fat, you need to own it. If you’re skinny, you need to own it. Maybe I’ve felt this way and that has led me to do so many surgeries. It’s complicated." — Maria da Gloria de Sousa

Look At This is NPR’s experiment in visual storytelling.

supersonicart:

BOOOOOOOM’s “Drawing on the Past” Gallery Show.
A week ago BOOOOOOOM and Herschel Supply premiered the collection of works from BOOOOOOOM’s project “Drawing on the Past" in a gallery show at Burrard Arts Foundation in Vancouver.  The work from the show featured artwork of a person, place or thing that positively affected the artist.  I was lucky enough to be asked by Jeff to be part of the show and I drew a drawing of San Francisco, California which has had many positive effects on my life.  You can learn more about the show on BOOOOOOOM.
Zoom Info
supersonicart:

BOOOOOOOM’s “Drawing on the Past” Gallery Show.
A week ago BOOOOOOOM and Herschel Supply premiered the collection of works from BOOOOOOOM’s project “Drawing on the Past" in a gallery show at Burrard Arts Foundation in Vancouver.  The work from the show featured artwork of a person, place or thing that positively affected the artist.  I was lucky enough to be asked by Jeff to be part of the show and I drew a drawing of San Francisco, California which has had many positive effects on my life.  You can learn more about the show on BOOOOOOOM.
Zoom Info
supersonicart:

BOOOOOOOM’s “Drawing on the Past” Gallery Show.
A week ago BOOOOOOOM and Herschel Supply premiered the collection of works from BOOOOOOOM’s project “Drawing on the Past" in a gallery show at Burrard Arts Foundation in Vancouver.  The work from the show featured artwork of a person, place or thing that positively affected the artist.  I was lucky enough to be asked by Jeff to be part of the show and I drew a drawing of San Francisco, California which has had many positive effects on my life.  You can learn more about the show on BOOOOOOOM.
Zoom Info
supersonicart:

BOOOOOOOM’s “Drawing on the Past” Gallery Show.
A week ago BOOOOOOOM and Herschel Supply premiered the collection of works from BOOOOOOOM’s project “Drawing on the Past" in a gallery show at Burrard Arts Foundation in Vancouver.  The work from the show featured artwork of a person, place or thing that positively affected the artist.  I was lucky enough to be asked by Jeff to be part of the show and I drew a drawing of San Francisco, California which has had many positive effects on my life.  You can learn more about the show on BOOOOOOOM.
Zoom Info
supersonicart:

BOOOOOOOM’s “Drawing on the Past” Gallery Show.
A week ago BOOOOOOOM and Herschel Supply premiered the collection of works from BOOOOOOOM’s project “Drawing on the Past" in a gallery show at Burrard Arts Foundation in Vancouver.  The work from the show featured artwork of a person, place or thing that positively affected the artist.  I was lucky enough to be asked by Jeff to be part of the show and I drew a drawing of San Francisco, California which has had many positive effects on my life.  You can learn more about the show on BOOOOOOOM.
Zoom Info
supersonicart:

BOOOOOOOM’s “Drawing on the Past” Gallery Show.
A week ago BOOOOOOOM and Herschel Supply premiered the collection of works from BOOOOOOOM’s project “Drawing on the Past" in a gallery show at Burrard Arts Foundation in Vancouver.  The work from the show featured artwork of a person, place or thing that positively affected the artist.  I was lucky enough to be asked by Jeff to be part of the show and I drew a drawing of San Francisco, California which has had many positive effects on my life.  You can learn more about the show on BOOOOOOOM.
Zoom Info

supersonicart:

BOOOOOOOM’s “Drawing on the Past” Gallery Show.

A week ago BOOOOOOOM and Herschel Supply premiered the collection of works from BOOOOOOOM’s project “Drawing on the Past" in a gallery show at Burrard Arts Foundation in Vancouver.  The work from the show featured artwork of a person, place or thing that positively affected the artist.  I was lucky enough to be asked by Jeff to be part of the show and I drew a drawing of San Francisco, California which has had many positive effects on my life.  You can learn more about the show on BOOOOOOOM.

npr:

It might be easy to mistake Lia Lee’s business for a food truck. It’s a big, light-pink vehicle that looks a bit like a place you buy a cupcake, but it’s something entirely different.
Owner Lia Lee sells trendy clothing and accessories out of the truck she calls Street Boutique in the Washington, D.C., area. Wherever she parks and opens her doors, the store’s open.
Street Boutique represents a new type of business popping up around the country. Over the past few years, hundreds of women — and some men — from fashion students to longtime retail workers who want to open their own stores, have launched trucks to sell clothing in every region of the U.S.
Make Room, Food Trucks. Mobile Fashion Stores Have Hit The Streets
Photo credit: James Clark/NPR

Entrepreneurship
Zoom Info
npr:

It might be easy to mistake Lia Lee’s business for a food truck. It’s a big, light-pink vehicle that looks a bit like a place you buy a cupcake, but it’s something entirely different.
Owner Lia Lee sells trendy clothing and accessories out of the truck she calls Street Boutique in the Washington, D.C., area. Wherever she parks and opens her doors, the store’s open.
Street Boutique represents a new type of business popping up around the country. Over the past few years, hundreds of women — and some men — from fashion students to longtime retail workers who want to open their own stores, have launched trucks to sell clothing in every region of the U.S.
Make Room, Food Trucks. Mobile Fashion Stores Have Hit The Streets
Photo credit: James Clark/NPR

Entrepreneurship
Zoom Info
npr:

It might be easy to mistake Lia Lee’s business for a food truck. It’s a big, light-pink vehicle that looks a bit like a place you buy a cupcake, but it’s something entirely different.
Owner Lia Lee sells trendy clothing and accessories out of the truck she calls Street Boutique in the Washington, D.C., area. Wherever she parks and opens her doors, the store’s open.
Street Boutique represents a new type of business popping up around the country. Over the past few years, hundreds of women — and some men — from fashion students to longtime retail workers who want to open their own stores, have launched trucks to sell clothing in every region of the U.S.
Make Room, Food Trucks. Mobile Fashion Stores Have Hit The Streets
Photo credit: James Clark/NPR

Entrepreneurship
Zoom Info

npr:

It might be easy to mistake Lia Lee’s business for a food truck. It’s a big, light-pink vehicle that looks a bit like a place you buy a cupcake, but it’s something entirely different.

Owner Lia Lee sells trendy clothing and accessories out of the truck she calls Street Boutique in the Washington, D.C., area. Wherever she parks and opens her doors, the store’s open.

Street Boutique represents a new type of business popping up around the country. Over the past few years, hundreds of women — and some men — from fashion students to longtime retail workers who want to open their own stores, have launched trucks to sell clothing in every region of the U.S.

Make Room, Food Trucks. Mobile Fashion Stores Have Hit The Streets

Photo credit: James Clark/NPR

Entrepreneurship

npr:

World War I left many soldiers with disfiguring scars. So American artist Anna Coleman Ladd set up her own studio in Paris and set to work sculpting new faces for those who had lost a piece of theirs in trench warfare.
Ladd started by getting to know the men: their quirks, daily habits, what their siblings looked like, the limited facial expressions they were still capable of. Then, she would choose an expression. For some, that expression would be the only one they could wear.
The Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art has just posted a collection of Ladd’s papers online — photos, letters, diaries and other texts documenting her work.
One Sculptor’s Answer To WWI Wounds: Plaster, Copper And Paint
Photo: American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution

npr:

World War I left many soldiers with disfiguring scars. So American artist Anna Coleman Ladd set up her own studio in Paris and set to work sculpting new faces for those who had lost a piece of theirs in trench warfare.

Ladd started by getting to know the men: their quirks, daily habits, what their siblings looked like, the limited facial expressions they were still capable of. Then, she would choose an expression. For some, that expression would be the only one they could wear.

The Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art has just posted a collection of Ladd’s papers online — photos, letters, diaries and other texts documenting her work.

One Sculptor’s Answer To WWI Wounds: Plaster, Copper And Paint

Photo: American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution